Musical Delicacies

— Early Music Concert Series —

??????????????????: “Wahre Delineation der königlichen Stadt Brünn in Mähren” (Johann Christoph Laidig fecit, between 1701 and 1717)
250 Kč / 150 Kč / 90 Kč

Melante – the unknown Telemann

Music for two lutes from the library of the Cistercian abbey in Grüssau (Krzeszów).

Thursday 23 March 2017 19:00 (introduction) & 19:30 (concert) — Old Townhall (Fresco hall), Radnická 8, 602 00 Brno, Czech Republic.

Both artists play on identical lutes from the workshop of Lars Jonsson, Dalarö (SE). This model was very popular in the Baroque era; its belly is based on an earlier instrument from the workshop of Hans Frei.

Programme

Georg Philipp Telemann (1681 – 1767) Partie Polonoise en B ÿ traduite de C à deux luths Nº 6to
faite à 2 violes et la basse par l’autheur Msr Melante   (TWV 39:1, PL–Wu RM 4135 olim Mf 2001)
Ouverture — Harlequinade — Le Ris — Rigidon — Combattans — Hanaque — Sarrois — Gigue
Anonymus
maybe Silvius Leopold Weiss (1687 – 1750)
[Suite B-flat major]   (CZ–Bm A372)
Prelude. Adagio — Rondon — Sarabande — Menuet-Trio-Menuet — Guige (sic!)
Franz Xaver Richter (1687 – 1750) Partie en B à deus luths Nº 3tio
faite à 2 violes, la taille et la basse par l’autheur Msr Richter   (PL–Wu RM 4135 olim Mf 2001)
Entrée — Tardif — Passepied — Bourée — Menuete — Gigue
—  [Suite A minor]   (PL–Wu 4141 olim Mf 2009)  —
Anonymus [sans titre]
Silvius Leopold Weiss (1687 – 1750) Prelude
Jan Antonín Losy (cca. 1650 – 1721) Aire
Jean-Baptiste Lully (1632 – 1687) Aire
Georg Philipp Telemann (1681 – 1767) Paÿsans   (TWV 39:2)
Georg Philipp Telemann (1681 – 1767) Partie Nº 13 en G ÿ traduite d’A à deux luths
faite à 2 hautbois, 1 viole discordée, 1 taille, et la basse par l’autheur Msr Melante   (TWV 39:2, PL–Wu RM 4135 olim Mf 2001)
Ouverture — Effronterie — Air — Rigidon — Menuete-Trio-Menuete — Paÿsans

About the project

The concert is part of the project “Music by Czech and German composers from the lute collections of the library of the Cistercian Abbey in Grüssau (Krzeszów)”. The project includes a series of educational activities in cooperation with the Janáček Academy of Music and Performing Arts in Brno, the University of the Arts Bremen and The Prague Conservatoire.

Church of the Assumption (1728–1735), Grüssau (Krzeszów) — Photo: Jacek Halicki (CC-BY-SA 3.0 PL). Church of the Assumption (1728–1735), Grüssau (Krzeszów).
Photo: Jacek Halicki (CC-BY-SA 3.0 PL)
Project: Music by Czech and German composers from the lute collections of the library of the Cistercian Abbey in Grüssau (Krzeszów)
We 22.03.2017
14:00 – 20:00
Masterclass
Joachim Held
Janáček Academy (JAMU),
Komenského náměstí 6, Brno
Free
admission
Th 23.03.2017
19:00 introduction
19:30 concert
Concert
Melante – the unknown Telemann
Old Townhall,
Radnická 8, Brno
250 Kč
150 Kč

90 Kč
Fr 24.03.2017
19:00 introduction
19:30 concert
Concert
Melante – the unknown Telemann
Jan Deyl Conservatory,
Maltézské náměstí 14, Prague
300 Kč
200 Kč
90 Kč
Sa 25.03.2017
10:00 – 18:00
Masterclass
Joachim Held & Jan Čižmář
The Prague Conservatoire,
Valdštejnská 14, Prague
Free
admission
Th 01.06.2017
10:00 – 18:00
Masterclass
Jan Čižmář
University of Arts Bremen,
Dechanatstr. 13–15, Bremen
Free
admission
Fr 02.06.2017
20:00
Concert
Melante – the unknown Telemann
University of Arts Bremen,
Dechanatstr. 13–15, Bremen
Free
admission
Sa 03.06.2017
19:00
Concert
Melante – the unknown Telemann
St. Lawrence Church,
Dorfstraße, Kating (DE)
Free
admission

About the programme

Today’s concert presents unknown compositions from the pens of well-known composers, especially Georg Philipp Telemann whose anniversary we are commemorating in 2017. This programme for the unusual instrumentation of two lutes draws from the vast collection of lute tablatures in the library of the Cistercian monastery in Grüssau (today Krzeszów, Poland). In this abbey, as well as in the whole region of Silesia, Bohemia and Moravia, the lute was a very popular instrument during the 17th and 18th centuries, to wit, mostly in its Baroque 11-course form. The main contributors to this development were the native Lower Silesians Esaias Reusner and Sylvius Leopold Weiss and the cities Breslau (Wrocław), Prague, Dresden and Leipzig.

The history of Grüssau was very eventful: The initial Benedictine monastery, founded in 1242 by Anna of Bohemia, was dissolved already in 1289. The chapter property was acquired by Bolko I “the Strict”, Piast duke of Schweidnitz (Świdnica), who founded a new Cistercian monastery in 1292. After the death of the last duke of Schwednitz in 1368, the vacant fief was incorporated with the Bohemian Crown (1392). In spite of destruction during the Husite Wars and the Thirty Years War, Grüssau became one of the wealthiest monasteries in Silesia; its chapter property comprised 297 km² with 30,000 inhabitants. Grüssau became part of Prussia in 1742 and the monastery was secularized in 1810; subsequently the musical part of the library (including the lute tablatures) was transferred to the Royal Academic Institute of Church Music in Breslau (today Wrocław). In 1952 the lute tablatures were moved to the University Library in Warsaw where they are stored today.

Grüssau (Krzeszów) monastery library — Photo: Jan Čižmář. Grüssau (Krzeszów) monastery library.

The monastery was re-established in 1919, this time with Benedictines from the Emaus monastery in Prague. However, after Grüssau fell to Poland in 1945, the monks were expelled and moved to Bad Wimpfen in Germany (1946). The monastery was instead populated by Benedictine nuns from Lviv (Lemberg/Lwów/Львів) who persisted the subsequent communist persecution in the years 1953–1989 and still inhabit the monastery today.

The majority of the lute tablatures were written during the Bohemian era in the first half of the 18th century, but some extend into the Prussian era. Also many monastic buildings date from this period (the entire abbey complex in Grüssau is known as the “pearl of the Silesian baroque”), including the two-storey library. Its rich inventory comprised many lute sources, including a series of virtually unknown pieces by German and Bohemian composers such as Georg Philipp Telemann, Franz Xaver Richter, Martin Prantl, Gottfried Finger, Karl Sedlack and Jan Zach.

Quote (Johann Mattheson, Grundlage einer Ehren-Pforte,
Hamburg 1740, pag. 369)

A Lully has won fame; Corelli may be praised; but Telemann alone above all praise is raised.

This quote from music’s “Who is Who” by the distinguished composer Johann Mattheson or the title of incomparable master bestowed upon him by Christian Friedrich Daniel Schubart show the high esteem which Georg Philipp Telemann (1681–1767) enjoyed among his colleagues and music theorists of the 18th century. And rightly so! No other Baroque composer left future generations with so extensive and diverse compositions of the highest quality. Telemann composed in almost all the forms and genres of his time: Operas, cantatas, oratorios, passions, concerts, overtures, sonatas, suites, the list could be continued. Telemann himself played the harpsichord, the violin, the flute, oboe, shawm, viol, etc., so he could fully deploy each instrument to its advantages. Yet almost nothing is known about his relationship to the lute. The lute pieces that Telemann edited in his periodical Der Getreue Musikmeister were written by other composers: Silvius Leopold Weiss and Ernst Gottlieb Baron.

Title page: Partie Polonoise en B ÿ Traduite de C à Deux Leuths pour Le Secondième Nº 6to, Faite à 2 Viole, a La Baße, par L’Autheur Msr Melante. Title page: Partie Polonoise en B traduite de C Nº 6to par Msr. Melante.

Some years ago, the musicological world was surprised by the identification of an instrument called galizzona (also mandora or chalcedone) and its deployment, among other things, in many of Telemann’s cantatas and orchestral works. This instrument of the lute family was a contemporary of the baroque lute. It was mainly used to play basso continuo or simpler solo repertoire. In constrast, the baroque lute was primarily a solo instrument and was also often played in chamber orchestras. In addition to compositions in the popular combination of lute with violin and bass (Lauthen Concert, lute trio), lute duets with flute, or real lute concerts with obbligato lute, there also have survived several notable duets for two lutes. Most of them stem from a single anthology from the Grüssau collection under the signature MF 2001.

Grüssau (Krzeszów) monastery — Photo: Wikipedia User:Asmodaeus. Grüssau (Krzeszów) monastery.

Altogether this anthology contains 13 duets, and some of the title pages indicate that they are arrangements for two lutes of pieces originally written for a larger instrumental ensemble. Besides being an important source of music for this instrumentation, they are also often the only surviving version of the indicated compositions; indeed, in most cases the original orchestral version is not preserved. This is the case for both Telemann’s works in this programme; only the lute versions are known, and even though they are not original, they are still a very exciting discovery for the research of Telemann. The fact that Melante, the author of two partitas in a forgotten tabulature anthology, is an anagram of Telemann’s name, was not realized even by the professional public for a long time. At the same time, the Partie polonoise with its remarkable structure is indeed an example of Telemann’s mastery in applying the so-called national styles — dances with the names Hanaque (Hanna, Haná in Moravia) und Sarrois (Sorau, Żary, today in Poland, the city where Telemann in 1704–1709 was chapelmaster at the court of count Erdmann II von Promnitz).

Richter’s Partie in the manuscript MF 2001 was until recently such an orphan. The Polish musicologist Grzegorz Joachimiak, who devoted his dissertation to the Grüssau collection of lute manuscripts, found in the university library in Uppsala (Sweden) the original music material that apparently had served as template for the reworking as a lute duet. We can thus trace the steps taken by the Grüssau scribe while arranging the orchestral scores for the instrumentation for two lutes.

It is remarkable that in yet another anthology in Grüssau, MF 2009, there are works by Telemann. They are written as part of a Suite in A minor. It is followed by works by Gottfried Finger, a native of Hanna (Haná, the area depicted musically by Telemann in the last piece in today’s concert, the Partie Nº 6). While Finger himself probably was an active lute player (James Talbot at least describes him as playing the mandora) and these compositions apparently were written for the lute, the movements attributed to Telemann are surely secondary arrangements. Surprisingly, they are again the same compositions, movements from Partie Nº 13 from the end of our programme, originally written for chamber ensemble. The version for solo lute is in the original key of A minor. The third appearance of movements from this very Partie Nº 13 – this time in G minor for lute solo (or the second lute part has been lost) – is in a manuscript probably of Grüssau origin, today kept in Stockholm. Thanks to the research of one monastic collection, also the available solo repertoire for baroque lute has been enriched by the names of some renowned composers.

Jan Čižmář


Photo: Joachim Held.

Joachim Held

Joachim Held was born in Hamburg. He received his musical education at the Schola Cantorum Basiliensis as a student of Eugen Dombois and Hopkinson Smith, graduating with a “Diploma of Period Music” in 1988. From 1988–1990 he studied with Jürgen Hübscher at the Musik­hochschule Karlsruhe, graduating with a “Künstlerische Abschluss­prüfung”. In 1990 he was awarded the second prize at the Concours Musica Antiqua of the Flandern Festival in Brügge, marking the beginning of an an intensive international concert activity as soloist, chamber musician and continuo player.

Since 1993 (L’incoronazione di Poppea in the Salzburg Festival) Joachim Held performed regularly under the direction of Nikolaus Harnoncourt. Under Harnoncourt he also participated in the production of Henry Purcell’s King Arthur at the Salzburg Festival.

Since 1992 Joachim Held appeared with Il Giardino Armonico (Milan) in numerous concerts and on recordings (amongst others on the Vivaldi Album with Cecialia Bartoli for Decca). Since 2005 Joachim Held’s solo-CDs are released world-wide by Hänssler Classic. That year appeared the Schele Manuskript Hamburg 1619 CD (co-produced with the Swiss Radio DRS2 Zurich) and the Erfreuliche Lautenlust with music by Austrian composers for the Baroque lute. This CD was awarded the “Echo Klassik 2006” for the best solo recording of music from the 17th/18th centuries. In 2006 the CD German Lute Music of the Baroque was released by Hänssler Classic in cooperation with Deutschlandfunk Köln. In 2007 followed Che Soavita, Italian lute music of the Baroque, and in June 2008 Musique pour le roi, French lute musique of the Baroque. In 2010 he devoted the CD Merry Melancholy to the music of the time of John Dowland. His most recent CD with lute music by Johann Sebastian Bach was released in 2013, also by Hänssler Classic.

As a soloist Joachim Held appeared amongst others at the Musikfestspielen Potsdam Sanssouci, at the International Bach Festival Schaffhausen, the Schwetzinger Festspiele, the Bachfesttage in Köthen, the Concerti a San Maurizio in Milan, the Early Music Forum Budapest, the Hausmusik concert series of the ORF Vienna, the Lute Society London, the Schleswig-Holstein Music Festival, the Bachwoche Ansbach and the Händel festivals in Halle an der Saale and in Göttingen.

Since September 2007, Joachim teaches at the Royal Conservatory in The Hague. In 2010 he was appointed Professor for Historical Lute Instruments at the Hochschule für Künste in Bremen.

Photo: Jan Čižmář

Jan Čižmář

Jan Čižmář is a versatile performer focusing on historical plucked instruments. He performs regularly in Europe, Asia and the USA with ensembles such as Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, Orchestra of the Eighteenth Century, Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra and Capella Cracoviensis, and under conductors such as Frans Brüggen, Christopher Hogwood, Giovanni Antonini, Yannick Nézet–Séguin and Christina Pluhar. He appears also as soloist with of baroque and renaissance repertoire, and is the artistic leader of the ensemble Plaisirs de Musique.

After graduation in guitar and musicology in his native Brno he studied at the Royal College of Music in London, where he began playing the lute in the class of Jakob Lindberg. He continued his studies at the Royal Conservatory of The Hague with the teachers Nigel North, Joachim Held, Mike Fentross and Christina Pluhar.

He was the founder and editor of the Czech guitar magazine Kytara and contributes regularly to other musical periodicals. He is also intensely involved with publishing and research activities in the field of early music.

Jan Čižmář taught lute and related instruments at the Karol Szymanowski Academy of Music in Katowice in Poland; currently he is teaching at the Janáček Academy of Music and Performing Arts (JAMU) in Brno, the Academy of Ancient Music at Masaryk University in Brno, and as a guest teacher at the Fryderyk Chopin University of Music in Warsaw. He regularly gives courses and masterclasses in Europe and overseas.


Thank you

The concert enjoys the auspices of the Minister of Culture of the Czech Republic Mgr. Daniel Herman, the Governor of the South Moravian Region JUDr. Bohumil Šimek and the Mayor of the Statutory City Brno Ing. Petr Vokřál.

It takes place with financial support from the Česko-německý fond budoucnosti and the Statutory City of Brno.

Logo of Ministry of Culture Logo Jihomoravského kraje Logo Statutárního města Brna Česko-německý fond budoucnosti Hudební fakulta JAMU v Brně Erasmus+